Ask the Executive Director:

In answer to your question, Crockett, Bowie, and Travis all sacrificed their lives fighting Santa Anna's army at the Alamo. The answer is D. Good luck on the rest!

—Kent

Ask the Executive Director:

One of the most pivotal moments in Texas history, the Battle of San Jacinto, which ultimately gave Texas its independence from Mexico, took place on April 21, 1836. Your answer is D.

—Kent

Ask the Executive Director:

The Texas State Historical Association provides detailed accounts of Texas heroes who served in World War II. In this question, all but General George S. Patton were born and raised in Texas. The answer is B.

—Kent

Ask the Executive Director:

Juan Seguín entered the Alamo with other Texan military and went on to organize a company that was the only Tejano unit to fight at the Battle of San Jacinto. The answer is B.

—Kent

Ask the Executive Director:

The annexation of Texas to the United States became a topic of political and diplomatic discussion after the Louisiana Purchase in 1803 and became a matter of international concern between 1836 and 1845, when Texas was a Republic. The answer is D—Texas kept its public land, it retained the right to split into five states, and annexation was based on a joint resolution of the U.S. Congress.

—Kent

Ask the Executive Director:

After the storeship Aimable was lost at the mouth of Matagorda Bay, her crew and several disenchanted French colonists boarded the Joly and returned to France. The answer is B.

—Kent

Ask the Executive Director:

Francita Alavez, the "Angel of Goliad," accompanied Capt. Telesforo Alavez to Texas in March 1836. Her first name is variously given as Francita, Francisca, Panchita, or Pancheta, and her surname as Alavez, Alvárez, or Alevesco. She is credited for saving many lives at the Goliad massacre. The answer is B.

—Kent

Ask the Executive Director:

Forming the boundary of Texas and the international U.S.–Mexican border for 1,245 river miles, the Rio Grande is the longest river in Texas, measuring 1,900 miles from its mouth to the Gulf of Mexico. The answer is B.

—Kent

Ask the Executive Director:

When the Mexican military commander dispatched a unit to retrieve a small cannon belonging to the American colonists in the small town of Gonzales, a battle ensued. This conflict is now known as the Battle of Gonzales. Your answer is D.

—Kent

Ask the Executive Director:

The Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo added more than 500,000 square miles to the United States' land mass while increasing its overall political and economic standing in the world. The answer is D.

—Kent

Take the quiz and find out.

Do you know the name of the Texas state flower? Can you recite all the words to The Yellow Rose of Texas? Discover your Texas aptitude by taking this online quiz.

Modeled after the Texas Quiz Show, an annual middle school competition sponsored by the Texas State Historical Association (TSHA), this online quiz will determine whether you are indeed smarter than a seventh grader.

So roll up your sleeves and get ready to test your Texas history prowess.

Need a little help? No problem. You have three lifelines to use throughout the quiz. You may use each lifeline just once. Good luck!

Take the Quiz ►

Which of the following Texas heroes died in the Battle of the Alamo in March 1836?




Question 1 of 10

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The siege and the final assault on the Alamo in 1836 constitute the most celebrated military engagement in Texas history. The battle was conspicuous for the large number of illustrious personalities among its combatants. These included Tennessee congressman David Crockett, entrepreneur-adventurer James Bowie, and—although not nationally famous at the time—William Barret Travis, who achieved lasting distinction as commander at the Alamo. All of these men lost their lives in the battle.

For many Americans and most Texans, the battle has become a symbol of patriotic sacrifice.

next question ►

On what date did Texas win its independence from Mexico, at the Battle of San Jacinto?





Question 2 of 10

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The Battle of San Jacinto, fought on April 21, 1836, was the concluding military event of the Texas Revolution. One of the eight inscriptions on the exterior base of the San Jacinto Monument reads:

"Measured by its results, San Jacinto was one of the decisive battles of the world. The freedom of Texas from Mexico won here led to annexation and to the Mexican War, resulting in the acquisition by the United States of the states of Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, Nevada, California, Utah, and parts of Colorado, Wyoming, Kansas, and Oklahoma. Almost one-third of the present area of the American nation, nearly a million square miles of territory, changed sovereignty."

next question ►

Secretary of the Navy Frank Knox said after World War II that Texas had contributed a larger percentage of men to the armed forces during that war than any other state. In all, 33 Texans won the Medal of Honor. Which of the following World War II heroes was not born in Texas?





Question 3 of 10

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Texans served with distinction in various theaters of operation in World War II. In all, 33 Texans won the Medal of Honor—25 in the Army or Air Force and 8 in the Navy or Marines. Lt. Audie L. Murphy of Farmersville was the most highly decorated American in the war. Dwight D. Eisenhower, the Supreme Allied Commander in Europe, was born in Denison. Chester W. Nimitz, appointed commander of the Pacific Fleet after the Pearl Harbor disaster, was a Fredericksburg native and descendant of a pioneer Texas German family.

Many of the Texans who fought in World War II were members of minority groups who faced discrimination and segregation at home. Doris Miller, a black mess attendant from Waco, serving on the USS West Virginia, became one of the first African-American heroes of the war at Pearl Harbor.

Unfortunately, Texas cannot claim General Patton as one of our own.

next question ►

All of the esteemed Mexican Texans listed below contributed to the early success of the Republic of Texas—three of whom were among the 59 men who signed the Texas Declaration of Independence. One of them helped win Texas independence at San Jacinto, leading a Tejano unit in the battle. He served in the Senate of the Texas Republic and was later mayor of San Antonio. Who was he?





Question 4 of 10

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Juan N. Seguín entered the Alamo with other Texan military and went on to organize a company that was the only Tejano unit to fight at the Battle of San Jacinto.

next question ►

Shortly after Texas independence in 1836, the citizens of the new Republic voted to seek annexation by the United States, fearing another attack by Mexico. Strong opposition emerged in the U.S. Congress, led by then-congressman John Quincy Adams. In 1845, under President James K. Polk, annexation was finally accomplished. What were the unique aspects of the annexation?




Question 5 of 10

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The annexation of Texas to the United States became a topic of political and diplomatic discussion after the Louisiana Purchase in 1803 and became a matter of international concern between 1836 and 1845, when Texas was a Republic. Texas kept its public land and retained the right to split into five states, and annexation was based on a joint resolution of the U.S. Congress.

next question ►

René Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle, was a famous 17th-century explorer who traveled the Mississippi River by canoe to its mouth at the Gulf of Mexico in 1682 and claimed all of the lands drained by that great river in honor of King Louis XIV (thereby creating the name Louisiana). He returned in 1685 from France with the intention of establishing a permanent settlement near the river. By mistake, La Salle arrived at Matagorda Bay in present-day Texas. Which of his four ships successfully made it back to France?




Question 6 of 10

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From the start, the La Salle expedition was plagued by misfortune. He landed colonists at Matagorda Bay on February 20, 1685. After the storeship Aimable was lost at the mouth of the bay, her crew and several disenchanted colonists returned to France with the naval vessel Joly.

By the time a temporary fort was built on the eastern end of Matagorda Island, a series of other misfortunes had reduced the number of colonists to 180. As the work of building a more permanent settlement progressed, many succumbed to overwork, malnutrition, and Indians or became lost in the wilderness. In late winter 1686, the bark Belle, the only remaining ship, was wrecked on Matagorda Peninsula during a squall.

next question ►

At least 189 Texan volunteers died at the Alamo in early March 1836, but more than 340 were killed in the Goliad massacre later that month. Of the few who were spared at Goliad, many owed their lives to a woman later known as the "Angel of Goliad." Who was she?





Question 7 of 10

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Francita Alavez is credited for saving many lives at the Goliad massacre and came to be called the "Angel of Goliad." She is recognized as a heroine of the Texas Revolution.

next question ►

The diverse topography of Texas has helped provide our state an abundance of rivers, several of which have played important roles in Texas history. The rivers below are five of the "greatest" in Texas—at least as measured by their length. Which of these is the longest?





Question 8 of 10

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Forming the boundary of Texas and the international U.S.–Mexican border for 1,245 river miles, the Rio Grande is the longest river in Texas, measuring 1,900 miles from its source to the Gulf of Mexico.

next question ►

Texas has never been afraid to fight for its beliefs, and there has been no shortage of battles in Texas history. The following are five of the better known. One of these, on October 2, 1835, was the first skirmish of the Texas Revolution. A group of revolutionary Texans, not wanting to give up the town cannon to Mexican soldiers, challenged the Mexicans to "come and take it." Which battle was it?





Question 9 of 10

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When the Mexican military commander dispatched a unit to retrieve a small cannon belonging to the American colonists in the small town of Gonzales, a battle ensued. This conflict is now known as the Battle of Gonzales, and it marked a clear break between the American colonists and the Mexican government.

next question ►

Five of the more important treaties in Texas history are listed below. One of these treaties, signed on February 2, 1848, ended the Mexican War, recognized the annexation of Texas to the United States (consummated nearly three years before), and ceded to the United States Upper California (the modern state of California) and nearly all of the present American Southwest between California and Texas. Which treaty was it?





Question 10 of 10

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In 1845, the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo was signed, which ended the war with Mexico and specified the location of the international boundary. This treaty added more than 500,000 square miles to the United States' land mass while increasing its overall political and economic standing in the world.

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